revenue cycle management

3 Secrets to Successful ASC Revenue Cycle Management

Effective ambulatory surgery center (ASC) revenue cycle management can be hard to achieve, particularly as internal and external forces exercise their influence. According to Regent RCM’s Director of Revenue Cycle Management Erin Petrie, ASCs that pay attention to three key success factors are well-suited for the challenge.

“The first key success factor is driven by the healthcare industry’s shift toward value-based care,” Petrie says. “While assuming reimbursement risk from payers along with the responsibility to provide quality care has created some uncertainty and challenges for ASCs, managed care is in better hands. ASCs are equipped to both deliver quality care and manage costs more effectively than insurance companies ever were. But to be successful in revenue cycle management (RCM), ASCs need to become more adept at both managing costs and collecting additional revenue directly from patients, many of whom have selected healthcare insurance plans with lower premiums but higher deductibles.”

Another factor is also closely related to the evolution of value-based care. While many ASCs are succeeding at streamlining procedures and costs for procedures new to out-patient treatment, such as total joint replacement, payment bundling and reimbursement declines introduce new pressures. For example, payers are beginning to scrutinize payment of high-cost implant procedures and are driving a hard bargain when it comes to bundled payment agreements. As ASCs assume leadership of these bundles, a second key success factor is careful negotiation along the way. “You need to be diligent – check your costs, factor in economies of scale but also account for patient-driven variation, and renegotiate contracts annually,” Petrie suggests.

A third way to ensure successful RCM is to optimize business office staffing. “The best-run ASCs make sure their RCM staff is motivated and incentivized to aggressively pursue revenue, rather than just remaining content with the status quo,” Petrie says. “If an ASC’s staff is accepting only what the insurer pays and not fighting for what the center is contractually entitled to or higher than ‘usual and customary,’ that particular facility may be leaving a lot of money on the table.”