ASC Physicians in Operating Room

Physicians are Key to Revenue Cycle Success

While they may feel more comfortable managing matters related directly to patient care, physicians also have an important role to play in the overall financial sustainability of the ambulatory surgery center (ASC) where they practice. Whether their compensation is tied directly to productivity or collections or not, understanding the ins and outs of revenue cycle management is important.

But often, revenue cycle management isn’t a memorable lesson from medical school. The experts a Regent Revenue Cycle Management (Regent RCM) understand the importance of educating physicians on the financial aspects of providing quality healthcare.

“In many cases, surgeons do not understand all the interrelated aspects of how the organization bills and collects for services,” says Erin Petrie, Regent RCM’s Director of Revenue Cycle Management, “so they often need help understanding how the revenue cycle works and the key areas that require physician involvement.”

Petrie outlines three areas where physician involvement in RCM is critical:

  1. Coding

To facilitate insurance company payment, it is critical for physicians to facilitate proper coding for their procedures. While in some academic settings a staff person may select the specific ICD-10 and CPT codes for cases, under most circumstances it is the physicians who must own code selection. If they don’t, the case may remain unbilled or risk non-payment due to timely-filing limits, which can be as short as 20 days. Need help learning coding specifics? The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons offers a coding and reimbursement course.

  1. Documentation

Documenting what was done in a specific and detailed way is a critical part of the surgeon’s role in any ASC procedure, and using CPT language is the most efficient way to link the service to the correct CPT codes for appropriate reimbursement. For example, Petrie explains, it is no longer enough to specify “joint pain.” Instead, specifying the joint and the laterality in detail enables specific coding and increases the likelihood of timely reimbursement.

  1. Reviewing Accounts Receivable

Finally, Petrie suggests surgeons take active interest in understanding the ASC’s accounts receivable. Ask for a monthly A/R report and review it, she advises. Watch out for any increase in the number of accounts more than 90 days old, and ask for details about accounts in the 60-day column. When surgeons begin to take an active interest in the billing process, chances are the staff will, too.



For more information about understanding the ins and outs of revenue cycle management, contact Petrie or a member of her team at (708) 492-0531.