New Case Study: A/R Follow-Up Increases Collections in Ft. Myers

The Center for Specialized Surgery in Ft. Myers (TCSSFM), Florida is growing rapidly, in part because the center leverages Regent RCM benchmarks to gauge performance across all functions of the revenue cycle.  A new case study outlines the center’s positive experience with the benchmark for Accounts Receivable Follow-Up.

The A/R follow-up benchmark tracks how many of the cases a center has with an open balance are being followed up on each month. The gold standard expectation is that biller/collectors follow up with the payer for at least 95% of all the open claims every month.

The case study outlines steps TCSSFM has taken to achieve an amazing result: increasing collections by $125,000 per month in the past year. While center growth and the addition of high reimbursement procedures have contributed as well, efforts to follow up with payers on at least 95% of claims every month have been a big part of that success.

Erin Petrie, Regent RCM’s Director of Revenue Cycle Management says: “This metric allows us to drill down into the actual collector’s performance, versus just the center’s performance. A center might have a great month and collections are up through the roof, but that’s not necessarily a reflection of the efforts of that collector. Whereas your follow up, how many claims you’re touching every month, reflects your work.”

Want to learn more? Read the full case study here.

ASC Nurse evaluating revenue cycle

Decreasing Days Outstanding by Managing Charge and Claims Lag

Building on our latest guide where Regent RCM updated is established Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to highlight issues and determine how well an ASC is performing compared to other ASCs, the following post examines charge and claims lag.

Managing a financially successful ambulatory surgery center (ASC) hinges on efficient revenue cycle management (RCM), yet many center administrators struggle with charge lags leading to delayed claims submissions and ultimately delayed reimbursement. Lag days contribute to an uncertain revenue cycle. One of the most effective ways to decrease days outstanding is to manage lags and turnaround time.

Charge entry lag is calculated by the number of days from the date of service to the date charges are entered. Claim lag is defined as the date of service to the charge billing date. The best practice for ASCs for both lags together is less than three days. Charges should be entered as soon as they are coded and claims should be sent the same day, so there should be no difference between the claim lag and the charge lag.

“If centers are experiencing a difference between the two lags, this is an indication that the billing department may be holding claims or entering charges but not sending them out,” stated Erin Petrie, Director of Revenue Cycle Management. “Transcription should each be completed in 24 hours – that is the gold standard.”

Coding and physician dictation may also be contributing to slow turnaround times, and those are more complicated problems to solve. “At Regent RCM we get to the root of the lag problem by running daily reports on unbilled cases and from there, our staff will begin the research to understand the source of the problem,” explained Petrie. “Whether it is coding, transcription or dictation, we arm center staff with the necessary information to put processes in place to correct the problem.”

If your center is struggling with high charge and claims lag, click here to download our latest guide, and learn how to gain more control and efficiency.

Congratulations to our Q4 Award Winners

Regent Revenue Cycle Management announced individual and team 2018 award winners for the fourth quarter recently, honoring recipients for stellar performance in accordance with the Departments’ Key Performance Indicators and company’s RISE values .

Casey Eazell was the individual winner for the fourth quarter of 2018, meeting or exceeding benchmark metrics for the quarter for Cash Collection, AR Follow-Up, and Decrease in % of AR over 90 days. Eazell was also part of the group that took fourth quarter team honors. That team, led by Manager Vianca Bautista , also included Windy Cortez, Dacia Aviles and Lorena Gonzalez. All involved were honored earlier this year for their outstanding achievements.

“We’re so proud of this group of employees,” said Leslie Favela , RCM Manager Business Development “The fourth quarter is a tough time of year in our business, and each and every one of these folks went above and beyond to deliver excellence. They truly embody team spirit and the RISE values we stand for.”

Regent RCM’s RISE values are: Respectful Caring, Integrity, Stewardship, and Efficiency.
Our team strives to leverage these principles to deliver exceptional service and value to our ambulatory surgery center clients.

Congratulations!

Regent RCM Releases Updates to ASC-Specific Benchmarks

Since introducing nine ASC-specific revenue cycle management benchmarks in 2017, Regent Revenue Cycle Management (Regent RCM) has seen the ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) that use them gain a much better handle on their financial health. A new white paper offers insights from that experience and provides an update on Regent RCM’s metrics.

“ASC-specific measurement tools simply did not exist before we authored them,” says Regent RCM Director of Revenue Cycle Management Erin Petrie. “Having the tools and intel to gauge performance across all functions of the revenue cycle has been a game changer for center leadership.”

Regent RCM, a leading provider of innovative and cost-effective revenue cycle management services exclusively for ASCs, developed the initial ASC revenue cycle benchmarks with a plan to refine them as key learning emerged. The white paper updates the original benchmarks based on two years of data and insights and adds a new benchmark: Accounts Receivable Follow Up. This metric  goes deeper than overall center performance to provide a true measure of individual biller/collector performance.

Since early 2017, ASCs tracking the benchmarks have been especially successful against the benchmarks for Clean Claims and Denials.

“We’re increasing the Clean Claims benchmark in 2019 from 97% to 98% based on experience,” Petrie says. “We use a clearinghouse to provide us with data on whether or not our claims have all of the correct information to go out to the payers. And if they don’t, we’ve created an expectation for our staff to fix them in a timely fashion and get them out. That process has helped us make sure all of our claims go out clean, but in addition, our staff is now more aware of the issues, so they don’t make those omissions or errors in the first place.”

Similarly, since beginning to track denials and to shoot for a benchmark of less than 10% of claims denied two years ago, Regent RCM’s centers are now exceeding that gold standard. As a result, the benchmark is changing in 2019 to a gold standard of less than 5%.

The Regent RCM ASC Revenue Cycle Benchmarks have been embraced as a critical measurement tool to help surgery centers accurately measure revenue cycle health, and ultimately, account for every dollar they are entitled to. Regent RCM’s gold standards will continue to evolve as the Regent RCM team culls insights from the data and shares them to educate center business staffs, negotiate with payers, and assist ASCs around the country in receiving the most revenue for care that they can.

To learn more, download the free white paper here.

How Does Your ASC Measure Up? Benchmarking Basics for Revenue Cycle Health

Until recently, when it came to “diagnosing” revenue cycle health, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) often turned to hospital or physician practice metrics, due to a lack of revenue cycle measurement tools developed specifically for them. But ASCs really needed a view into revenue cycle performance that factored in the business challenges unique to their business model and circumstances.

Regent Revenue Cycle Management (Regent RCM) has addressed that need head on with development of ASC-specific benchmarking tools that ASC leaders can customize and deploy. In a white paper titled, “Using ASC-Specific Benchmarks to Assess the Health of Your Revenue Cycle,” Regent RCM shares nine ASC-specific benchmarks to help track and measure revenue cycle performance. The paper outlines how surgery centers can use the benchmarks to assess their revenue cycle; including understanding how numbers can be improved, why they might fluctuate and how they can often be misleading.

The benchmarks dive deep into key components that shape and define revenue cycle health, offering both a benchmark and a Regent RCM “Gold Standard” to help ASCs understand what’s optimal and work to improve in each of the following areas:

1. FTEs/1000 Cases
2. Days Outstanding/Days in AR
3. Percent of AR Over 90 Days
4. Claim Lag
5. Charge Lag
6. Statement Lag
7. Claim Denial Percent
8. Clean Claim Percent
9. Net Collection Rate

The white paper also includes examples of success gained through application of the benchmarks. For example, one facility in the southeast significantly improved the efficiency of its Accounts Receivable efforts through consistent follow-up with accounts and a more thorough understanding of how each payer processes claims. In another ASC, a high volume orthopedic center, collections were nearly doubled from May to December, with no significant changes to volume or case mix. In this case, Regent RCM’s benchmarks helped the ASC work with its clearinghouse to develop custom edits to ensure clean claim submission.

Regent RCM is a leading provider of innovative and cost-effective revenue cycle management services exclusively for ASCs. To learn more about the company’s benchmarking tools for ASCs, download the white paper here.

asc revenue cycle billing analysis

Uncovering Improvements through Denied Claim Cause Audits and Management

No ambulatory surgery center wants to miss out on revenue because of inefficient revenue cycle management practices.

An organized and streamlined revenue cycle requires an ASC to get every detail of coding, billing, and collections right the first time – and on time. By following a few straightforward – but important – steps, ASCs can review their current revenue cycle management processes and identify any problem areas that need to be resolved.

Regent RCM has developed a new guide that outlines three regular audits ASCs can incorporate to uncover mistakes and inefficiencies in order to enhance revenue cycle performance. The guide recommends three strategies to analyze and improve:

  1. Denied claim cause and management
  2. Coding accuracy
  3. Payer contract adhesion

In this blog, we outline the denied claim assessment and how to better manage these audits.

Around 10 to 20% of healthcare provider revenue is tied up in denials, and the top two causes for denied claims are missing information and inaccurate information. ASCs can dramatically improve their financial performance just by reducing the number of claim denials.

Regent recommends taking these actions to manage denials more effectively:

  • Act immediately. – Address every denied claim within a week of receiving notice from an insurance company.
  • Investigate the cause. – Reach out to the payer to understand why the claim was denied and how it can be amended.
  • Track past claims. – Analyze the reasons for denied claims and approaches that have been successful to tweak current processes.
  • Watch for patterns. – Pay attention to which errors, like misspelled names or missing information, are most common in denials.
  • Focus on prevention. – Remember that avoiding denied claims is the most effective way to minimizing days in A/R.

Learn how to implement this audit and our other strategies to uncover revenue cycle inefficiencies and boost financial performance. Download the guide.

Billing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them: Part 2

An ambulatory surgery center depends on an efficient revenue cycle management process for financial and operational stability. Because the revenue cycle involves complex and overlapping processes, an ASC needs a revenue cycle solution that can manage everything from billing and collections and payer contract negotiating to measurement and reporting and automated workflow tasks.

Billing mistakes can cause serious problems for an ASC, interfering with its immediate cash flow and long-term financial health. In a recent post, Regent RCM outlined prevention tactics for four common ASC billing errors. The second part of this series will examine four additional billing mistakes and how to avoid them.

  1. Not Reconciling Billing

It is crucial for ASCs to monitor patient files carefully, making sure that all performed procedures are billed and followed up on. Unbilled procedures result in lost revenue, damaging a center’s revenue cycle. Similarly, cases that are denied or rejected by the payer must be properly appealed or processed.

Solution: Utilize a system that tracks all performed cases and ensures that they are billed out within a certain timeframe. Use automated tools as much as possible, setting up notifications and reminders to follow up on claims or make edits as necessary.

  1. Neglecting to Appeal Claims

Inaccurate payments are unfortunately commonplace within the revenue cycle. The real problem arises when ASCs fail to appeal incorrect or incomplete payments in a timely manner. If a center doesn’t maintain a quick and streamlined appeals process, it can fall into harmful patterns and struggle to meet its financial goals.

Solution: Address flawed payments right away, setting a specific turnaround for sending out appeals. Regent RCM’s standard is to appeal all under- and no-pay claims within 24 hours.

  1. Not Measuring Performance

Unidentified problems can’t be fixed. Kept busy with day-to-day responsibilities, ASCs often neglect to monitor key performance metrics of their revenue cycle – and any problems with net collection rates, A/R days, or statement, charge, or claim lags remain unresolved.

Solution: Implement measurement and reporting software to track specific benchmarks in the revenue cycle. Gauge the current health of the ASC’s performance, and set goals going forward. For example, the Regent RCM gold standard net collection rate is a minimum of 97%.

  1. Errors in Payment Posting

Erroneous payment posting can lead to confusion and financial losses for an ASC. A simple mistake, such as a typo in a payment amount, has a domino effect: an incorrect patient responsibility and billing statement, back-and-forth communication with the patient, a statement adjustment, and so on.

Solution: Check that all billing, payment, and collection information reconcile properly. If it is a challenge to manage the process with in-house staff, outsource it to a company with expertise in revenue cycle management. Regent RCM uses sophisticated software to post payments, ensure that they are paid according to contract, and turn over bad debts to collections.

Need expert assistance in improving your revenue cycle management? Contact Regent RCM

Internal Auditing for ASCs: Are You Receiving Maximum Revenue?

How would you rate the overall financial health of your ambulatory surgery center?

Are you producing maximum revenue – or are you running into obstacles that interfere with your profitability?

As an ASC administrator, you have an extensive to-do list on any given day. However, it’s important to make time to step back and look at your big-picture financial goals and processes.

Conducting an internal revenue cycle audit is an effective way to evaluate your ASC’s operations, identifying financial stress points, strengths, and opportunities. An internal audit examines, quantitatively and qualitatively, all components of the revenue cycle process. It helps you ask the right questions to reveal what is working and what can be improved, helping your center get on track and stay on track.

If you’ve noticed negative changes in important benchmarks, such as accounts receivable days, net collection rates, or statement and charge lags, a revenue cycle audit may be the best course of action.

According to Regent RCM’s Director of Revenue Cycle Management Erin Petrie, a successful self-audit focuses on four main financial areas of an ASC:

Reimbursement

Do a thorough examination of your center’s billing and reimbursement procedures, paying close attention to payer contracts and total revenue collected.

Coding and Billing

Evaluate coding procedures, whether your ASC has a certified coder on staff or outsources services. Determine if cases are coded and billed correctly, identifying inaccuracies that could delay, reduce, or invalidate claims.

Staffing

Assess how administrative employees spend their time and what causes their pain points. What

facilitates smooth operations? What requires excessive time or effort to accomplish?

Observation

Scrutinize business office functions over time, noting recurring inconsistencies or inefficiencies. Look for solutions, through technology or processes, that could address these problems.

To help you get started, the experts at Regent Revenue Cycle Management have developed a free guide, “How to Self-Audit and Improve Your ASC’s Financial Health.” It takes an in-depth look at key revenue cycle functions, giving you the information you need to keep your ASC within compliance while producing maximum revenue. Download the full guide here.

3 Tips to Maximize Surgery Center Billing and Coding

Regent RCM’s gold standard for days outstanding is 30 days or less, although the right number for a center could range from the mid- to high teens all the way up to 50, depending on payer mix and case mix. In this blog post, we’ve summarized 3 ways to keep days outstanding in check.

Manage Lags and Turnaround Time

Claims should always be sent the same day charges are entered, so the claim lag should be the same as the charge lag. If centers are experiencing a significant difference between the two, this is an indication that your billing department may be holding claims or that they’re entering charges prior to receiving the operative report. Managing lags and turnaround time is one of the easiest ways to decrease your days outstanding. “The charge entry lag is measured from the date of service to the date charges are entered. The charge entry lag should be less than five days, with the gold standard being less than two and a half days.” Said Erin Petrie, Regent RCM’s Director of Revenue Cycle Management.

Conduct Periodic Coding Audits

It is extremely important to conduct periodic coding audits by an outside coding company, whether your center outsources its coding services or employs a certified coder. “Regent coordinates bi-annual audits on all of our centers using an outside firm. By doing so, we eliminate the conflict of interest a regular coding company may have in finding coding errors in the hopes of gaining additional clients. All centers should be held to an acceptable standard above 90 percent accuracy but be given a chance to rebut coding inaccuracies found during an audit,” said Petrie.

Some disparities found during our coding audits center around what was performed during the procedure and what was dictated. Sound coding practice is to always code from the operative report and not from the procedure.

Choose the Right Clearinghouse

Choosing the right clearinghouse can make a significant difference in the efficiency of your business office. Most clearinghouses can send electronic claims and receive electronic remittance (ERA). ZirMed and others set themselves apart by performing electronic eligibility in either batch or individual mode, providing real-time statuses and having the ability to setup center-defined, custom claim edits. In addition, ZirMed rolled out a new enhancement recently which allows some of our centers to send worker’s comp claims, traditionally sent on paper, electronically by matching up a scanned operative report to the electronic claim. This has caused a decrease in our A/R greater than 90 days for worker’s comp, which is habitually one of the more challenging financial classes.

Keeping days outstanding to a minimum is a worthy task for all ASCs, one that requires constant diligence and strong organizational efforts from everyone involved in the process. The fruits of this labor can lead to steadier collections, a more organized business office, and more integrity in your reporting data

Learn more about Regent RCM’s expert billing and coding services for ASCs

4 Reasons ASCs Fail and How to Manage for Success

While many trends in healthcare today point to the value of outpatient care, ambulatory surgery centers can still falter if they fail to actively manage risk in critical areas. The experts at Regent Revenue Cycle Management have observed four common mistakes, and together with Regent Surgical Health, can help centers turn each challenge into an opportunity for growth.

  1. Poorly Managed Contracts
    ASC administrators face a variety of challenges when it comes to successfully managing their payor contract negotiations. One common problem is that often hard-working and well-intentioned administrators and office managers are too busy balancing numerous job responsibilities to dedicate the needed persistence and focus required to successfully negotiate expiring payor contracts. But with careful preparation, ASC administrators can keep more money to reward and fuel center growth by negotiating payor contracts that will adequately cover the full cost of services and ultimately streamline healthcare costs for all. Key strategies include: incorporating Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) changes into contracting, planning for future case mix changes and updated procedures, building in annual increases and multi-year contract increases, and overall caution/careful attention to terms when it comes to preferred provider organizations (PPO) and third-party administrators (TPA).
  2. Skyrocketing Costs
    Monitoring expenses and tracking trends are essential to managing costs. For example, if a center is losing money on unprofitable cases and inefficient supply management, tools that help keep administrators in the know can help immensely. To address this problem, Regent has spearheaded solutions like the use of electronic preference cards to replace old, less precise metrics. Electronic preference cards provide a wide swath of data, as information is collected and compared across member facilities to get a clear picture of supply expenditures. This allows surgery centers to discern which physician items are driving up costs, and find out where real savings can be captured. In addition, Regent has found that integrating the information with the help of electronic procurement systems like Inventory Optimization Solutions (IOS) helps ASCs better manage costs throughout a single center as well as throughout the entire organization.
  3. Failure to Bring in High-Reimbursement Cases
    To succeed in an era of tightening reimbursement practices, an ASC needs to stay ahead of the competition by adding profitable procedures that may not be available elsewhere, or risk losing such cases to the competition. Procedures with potential to deliver strong profits include (among others) major spine cases and total joint replacements (TJR). Moving TJR surgeries to an ASC makes sense for many reasons, both clinical and financial. It is important to first assess outcomes on an inpatient versus outpatient basis to see whether the results vary by setting type or provider.
  4. Revenue Cycle Management
    The way an ASC manages the revenue cycle can make or break its profitability. And with the Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid payment bundling, and updated ICD-10 guidelines looming, the revenue cycle landscape is changing at a rapid pace. Specialized expertise is required to ensure optimal results while anticipating new opportunities, and revenue cycle management can’t be an afterthought. The team Regent RCM understands the intricacies of the ASC revenue cycle, where problems commonly occur and how to fix them, as well as how to optimize reimbursement.

Are you interested in auditing your operations to ensure your ASC is maximizing revenue? A self-audit guide is available download here and will help identify your center’s financial stress points, strengths, and opportunities.

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